HVA’s benefit auction draws crowd, bidders

MORRIS — Luminaries and environmentalists turned out en masse on Sunday, Nov. 20 to support the Housatonic Valley Association’s (HVA) 30th Auction for the Environment, raising an estimated $171,000, which is a record breaker, during the gala affair at South Farms in Morris.

Proceeds from the sold-out event, hosted for the 10 th year by the actress Christine Baranski, a long-time Litchfield County resident and HVA board member, benefit the association’s education, land conservation and clean water projects to protect the natural character and environmental health of the Housatonic Valley.

“We can’t take for granted the beauty of the area and what we need to do to pass it on to the next generation,” said the event’s honorary chairwoman.

The Emmy and Tony Award-winning actress and star in CBS’s “The Good Fight” and HBA’s “The Gilded Age,” was assisted by co-chairs Rebecca Neary, Pat Kennedy Lahoud, Thomas Potter, Pam and Jack Baker, Philippa Durant, Margo Martindale, Diane Meier, Seth and Alexi Meyers, and Anne Swift and Lee Lord.

Auction items included luxury vacations, experiences with local luminaries, art, wine and culinary offerings. Speaking above the din of the 150 guests, Baranski noted, “This is very much about coming together as a community and supporting the environment and HVA, which is really doing the nuts and bolts of the work preserving the environment.”

HVA Director Lynn Werner, center, is flanked by auction committee co-chair Rebecca Neary, left, and Honorary Chairwoman Christine Baranski. Photo by Debra A. Aleksinas

HVA Director Michael and Martha Nesbitt of Lakeville. Photo by Debra A. Aleksinas

Elyse Harney of Salisbury and Bill Melnick of Sharon. Photo by Debra A. Aleksinas

Stacy Deming, GIS Manager for HVA, and Tim Abbott, land conservation director. Photo by Debra A. Aleksinas

HVA Director Lynn Werner, center, is flanked by auction committee co-chair Rebecca Neary, left, and Honorary Chairwoman Christine Baranski. Photo by Debra A. Aleksinas

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