HYSB Falcon 5K benefit draws 100-plus runners

LAKEVILLE — The inaugural Falcon 5K at Indian Mountain School took place on Saturday, Oct. 22, to support the Housatonic Youth Service Bureau. Over 100 runners set off on the hilly trails behind IMS on what proved to be a challenging course for runners.

“We couldn’t ask for a better day for this,” said Matt Andrulis-Mette, HYSB board member and unofficial race director.

Competitors in the race included students, faculty, area running enthusiasts and members of the Run 169 Towns Society, a group of runners who aspire to run a race in every town in the state of Connecticut.

Due to confusion over the official start time, the event occurred across two heats. The first group of runners set out at 9 a.m., the second at 10 a.m.

After both heats, the fastest time belonged to Kramer Peterson, cross-country coach at The Forman School in Litchfield.

“These were some of the hardest hills I’ve seen,” said Peterson.

Peterson crossed the finish line with a time of 21:25, more than 2 minutes faster than runner-up Leo Lussier’s time of 23:50. In third place, with a time of 23:52, was IMS student Miki Barrant.

In addition to the 5K, there were two fun-runs for youth competitors: a 100-meter dash and a 1-mile race. Both fun-runs were won by 11-year-old Finn Wallach.

“This is my first time racing,” said Finn. “Next year I’m doing the 3-mile race.”

The 1-mile race came down to a photo finish between Finn and older brother Jack Wallach, 12.

“He blocked me,” said Jack. “I didn’t know that wasn’t allowed,” said Finn.

Runners set off from the starting line of the inaugural Falcon 5K at Indian Mountain School on Saturday, Oct. 22. The race included more than 100 runners and benefited the Housatonic Youth Service Bureau. Photo by Riley Klein

A photo finish for the winner of the 1-mile fun-run between brothers Finn Wallach (red), the winner, and Jack Wallach (blue) during the Falcon 5K. Photo by Riley Klein

Runners set off from the starting line of the inaugural Falcon 5K at Indian Mountain School on Saturday, Oct. 22. The race included more than 100 runners and benefited the Housatonic Youth Service Bureau. Photo by Riley Klein
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