Children brought their parents to The Hotchkiss Library on Saturday

A popular feature at The Hotchkiss Library’s observance of “Take Your Child to the Library Day” on Saturday, Feb. 3, was the children’s story hour. Eloise Kivitz, 10, seated at right is preparing to present the first book reading of the morning. Seated at left is Renee DeSimone, head of circulation and children’s services at the library.

Leila Hawken

Children brought their parents to The Hotchkiss Library on Saturday

SHARON — It was hard to tell whether the grown-up took the child to the library or if it was the other way round.

Enthusiasm was in high gear as the staff at the Hotchkiss Library welcomed all for “Take Your Child to the Library Day,” observed Saturday, Feb. 3.

Now in its 13th year and celebrated worldwide, the event is held annually on the first Saturday in February.

At The Hotchkiss Library, the day coincided with the regularly scheduled Saturday morning story hour, drawing a capacity audience of parents and children, first to sing some cheery, settling-down songs and then to hear stories read aloud.

“I love reading to kids,” said Eloise Kivitz, 10, who kicked off the story hour with “No Pirates Allowed” by Rhonda Greene, her strong reading performance done with expression and clarity.

Mid-morning story time was organized by Renee DeSimone, head of circulation and children’s services, who also read aloud and had arranged for special features to add to the celebration. There was a basket of bookmarks that could be crayon-colored on the spot or taken home, a game where children could identify silhouettes of possibly familiar book characters, and even a cardboard cutout opportunity for a photo with a fun book character.

“I’m excited when parents come in with their kids,” said DeSimone as the families filed in. She acknowledged that sometimes it is difficult for families to find the time.

At the end of it all, children who checked books out received a gift bag to take home.

In the foreground, Eloise Kivitz, 10, is reading aloud.Leila Hawken

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