A year of car parades and protests on town Greens

Although this was a year when large indoor gatherings were discouraged because of COVID-19, there were plenty of outdoor gatherings, including protests in all the area towns against injustice toward Black Americans.

The protests were often large and always peaceful. Everyone wore face masks.

Unusually, many of the protesters were teens and college students; unusual because, often in the Northwest Corner, protests are mostly attended by retirees, including many who participated in historic anti-war and civil rights protests of the mid and early 20th century.

Not all the gatherings last year were protests about police brutality and civil rights. There was also a protest in Salisbury related to proposed cuts to postal service; and there was a memorial service on the Salisbury Green led by state Rep. Maria Horn following the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. 

A new wrinkle on group gatherings this year were car parades, which allowed groups to express strong feelings while remaining in the relative safety (from COVID-19) of their cars and trucks. There were memorial parades and birthday parades. Groups of teachers drove by the homes of students to wave and let the youngest among them know they weren’t forgotten. There were graduation parades in spring, including the ceremony at Lime Rock Park for the Class of 2020 at Housatonic Valley Regional High School.

And there was a traditional Northwest Corner car parade: Lime Rock Park couldn’t hold its normal Labor Day weekend historic and vintage car festival, but car owners from the area turned out for the annual parade that normally kicks off the vintage festivities. 

Litchfield County residents came together on the Salisbury Green in front of The White Hart in May to protest police action following the murder of George Floyd, who was killed during an arrest in Minnesota on May 25, 2020. Photo by Alexander Wilburn

Photo by Alexander Wilburn

Litchfield County residents came together on the Salisbury Green in front of The White Hart in May to protest police action following the murder of George Floyd, who was killed during an arrest in Minnesota on May 25, 2020. Photo by Alexander Wilburn

Latest News

Top seed Thomaston eliminates HVRHS from Berkshires tourney

Mia Dodge looked for offensive opportunities against Thomaston’s dominant defense in the Berkshire League semifinal game.

Riley Klein

WASHINGTON — Thomaston High School girls basketball defeated Housatonic Valley Regional High School (HVRHS) 53-25 in the Berkshire League tournament semifinals Tuesday, Feb. 20.

The defending champion Golden Bears advanced to the championship for a rematch of last year’s title game against Northwestern, which defeated Gilbert 61-44 in the semifinal match prior to the HVRHS/Thomaston game.

Keep ReadingShow less
Town planning to assume responsibility for local cemeteries

KENT — After months of consideration of disbanding the Kent Cemetery Association, the Board of Selectmen reviewed a nearly final draft of a new cemetery ordinance at a special workshop meeting Tuesday, Feb. 6.

If the new ordinance is approved at a town meeting, the town would take on responsibility for Kent’s six cemeteries, disbanding the association.

Keep ReadingShow less
Falls Village adopts new POCD

FALLS VILLAGE — The Board of Selectmen approved the new Plan of Conservation and Development (POCD) at a special meeting Tuesday, Feb. 13, which was held in person and online.

The selectmen and the Board of Finance both held special meetings Feb. 13 because the regular meeting date of Monday, Feb. 12, was the Lincoln’s Birthday holiday.

Keep ReadingShow less
Banned Book Awards champions children’s right to read
Judy Blume connected digitally at the ceremony and was honored with a lifetime achievement award.
Alexander Wilburn

There can be no question that democratic freedoms are currently being attacked and restricted in the United States, and somehow, children and the information they have access to have been the ongoing targets of attack.

As AP News reported in 2023: “More than 1,200 challenges were compiled in 2022, nearly double the then-record total from 2021 and by far the most since the American Library Association began keeping data 20 years ago.” Conservative groups across the country have become well-organized machines harassing individual public and school librarians with threats of legal and violent action. The message from these groups, often supported by government leaders, is that children should not have access to books — books meant for young readers — that engage with topics of race, gender or sexual identity.

Keep ReadingShow less